Telltale May Have Broken Labor Laws, Faces Lawsuit

Telltale May Have Broken Labor Laws, Faces Lawsuit - News

by Patrick Day-Childs , posted on 25 September 2018 / 1,680 Views

Telltale Games, which recently laid off a large chunk of its workforce, may have broken state and country labor laws, according to a former employee called Vernie Roberts.

Roberts and other former employees have submitted a class-action lawsuit against Telltale to the federal court of San Francisco. The lawsuit cites the federal Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act (WARN), which became law in 1988 and provides that - in the event of a mass lay-off of employees at firms with more than 100 staff - workers must be given at least 60 days' notice.

At a state level, California's WARN requires that if a company lowers its staff levels to 75 full or part-time workers then 60 days' notice is required. Failure to do so makes the company liable for staff pay and benefits for each day of the violation.

Roberts' lawsuit says that around 275 employees were laid off by Telltale without the required 60 days' notice, and without severance and with health care only provided until the end of the month.


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5 Comments

StriderKiwi (on 25 September 2018)

Serves them right! This is what any company deserves that ditches their hardworking staff at the drop of a hat. Hopefully the whole "declaring bankruptcy" doesn't interfere with the compensation too much.


Keybladewielder (on 25 September 2018)

I wish labor laws were as defended in my country


cycycychris (on 25 September 2018)

I believe I read before that this law probably doesn't apply to TellTale since they were seeking outside capital to keep the studio going. I don't the full detail though.


Liquid_faction (on 25 September 2018)

Telltale can't get a break.


Nighthawk117 (on 26 September 2018)

The class action lawsuit will fail. Yet more dumbass employment laws hinder actual hiring by companies that want to hire. This country needs a depression to clean up the bullshit.