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Review Scores

Ratings

     

Alternative Names

大神

Developer

Ready at Dawn Studios

Genre

Adventure

Other Versions

PS2, Series

Release Dates

04/15/08 Capcom
10/15/09 Capcom
06/13/08 Capcom

Community Stats

Owners: 629
Favorite: 47
Tracked: 9
Wishlist: 33
Now Playing: 13
 
8.8

Avg Community Rating:

 

Okami

11th Apr 2009 | 1,812 views 


Smeags

User Score
9.6
                         

Presentation - 9.5
Gameplay - 9.5
Value - 10
Stunning, Epic, and Awe Inspiring — Okami is the stuff of legends.

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Let’s get to the point I’m trying to make here: Okami is a wonderful game. You owe it to yourself to save all of Nippon as the sun god Okami Amaterasu. And if you haven’t, well, I’d encourage you to go out and get your paws (pun intended, as they all will be from here on out) on this fantastic title. Now that that’s out of the way, let’s get to the meat (or fish, or seeds, or herbs…) of what makes Okami such an amazing game.

It can’t be ignored that Okami shares many similarities with the beloved The Legend of Zelda series, and this is by no means a terrible thing. With much of the same gameplay elements, Okami shares a bond with the recent Zelda’s. The silent hero enters the dungeon, collect the item (or in this case brush stroke) necessary to defeating the terrible beastie within, and saves the world. To be compared to such a classic franchise is a great way to start off, but there are core differences that mark both pros and cons for Okami.

The first difference the player will see (literally) is the actual sights of Okami’s world. I cannot deny that this is one of the most beautiful games I have ever played. Nippon is a world of ancient Japanese artistry, with each landscape and creature carefully crafted into a beautiful masterpiece. As the sun goddess Okami Amaterasu, it is your duty to return the land of Nippon to its former beauty. One thing that is missing from the Wii version is the rice paper effect from the PS2. It’s a shame that part of Clover’s vision is now barely noticable. On the other hand, Okami is more vibrant than ever before, and I can’t complain about that. On it’s own visual merit, Okami could be worth playing just to see the land blossom before your very eyes. It’s that awe inspiring, even in this day of pushing polygons and pixels.

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Here’s where things start to get interesting. Even before Okami was released on the PS2, fans knew that the upcoming Wii could be the perfect fit for Okami’s core gameplay mechanic: the Celestial Brush. Imagine, using the WiiMote to brush to your (and Ammy’s) content. It should be a match made in heaven, right? Well, I’m here to tell you that the WiiMote pushes Okami forward in new ways, and backwards in others. When it comes to the celestial brush, using the IR function to paint the many brush techniques works extremely well, after some practice. Contrary to Nintendo’s quest to make games more accessible through control, Okami has a learning curve that could scare away those who wanted a flawless and seamless transition. Even Ready at Dawn (the developer responsible for the PS2 to Wii conversion) implemented certain “cheats” to help the player start out (pressing and holding the Z button helps those struggling to create a straight line). Even basic combat takes some getting used to, as combos are not executed by waggling the WiiMote ala Twilight Princess, but with precise rhythm and timing.

After using and experimenting with the Celestial Brush and motion based combat, all of a sudden everything will click. Right then, you’ll be drawing up your enemy’s demise and executing punishing combos with the greatest of ease. It’s a fantastic feeling as you use the brush in new and creative combinations to take down your foes one by one (or how many you decide to get rid of at a time). Drawing bombs, lily pads, vines, and other techniques become quick, simple motions as you travel across the world and accomplish the many quests available for Ammy. The Celestial Brush is a mechanic that works in so many great ways. Always available, quick, and painless, using Wii’s IR function on screen in such a way is a freshening experience.

The story of Okami is one of the game’s many strong points because it never gets in the way and yet it keeps everything fresh as the tale continues on. Okami begins with the sun goddess awakening to battle the fearsome demon Orochi. During her lengthy adventure (I spent 40+ hours on my first playthrough), she’ll come in contact with strange and fearsome beasts, mystical (and somewhat clumsy) gods, and many lovable characters (Including the wandering artist Issun, her companion in this story). The story is one of epic proportions, as good battles evil on a grand stage. With bosses bigger than life (and visually second to none) and plenty of twists that take the player along for the ride, at the end of it all you’ll have experienced a tale that few can match. And with a plethora of great extras unlocked after beating the game, you might even want to experience it all over again (Hey, that’s what I did).

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In the end, what can be said about Okami that hasn’t already been told? It’s a beautiful and epic game that will take the player on an adventure worth having. You’ll grow to love Ammy and the world she inhabits, and in no time you’ll be using her powers to their fullest potential. The story is one on a grand scale and will take the player on one heck of a ride. All in all, Okami’s weaknesses are greatly outweighed by its strengths. So what are you waiting for? For $40 you can find yourself with an adventure unlike any other.

+ 2 years later, Okami still boasts some of the most beautiful visuals on any console.
+ With plenty of collectibles, side quests, and upgrades, this adventure boasts 35+ hours of gameplay. Great extras make the game worthy of being played and loved all over again.
+ Tried and true gameplay is made fresh by the Celestial Brush. It doesn’t get much better than this folks.

- A tough inital learning curve will have some gamers dumbfounded on how to successfully take control of Ammy.
- The lack of the rice paper effect from the PS2 version could be a disappointment for some.
- You may find yourself with a lack of challenge. Okami is somewhat on the easy side.


Sales History

Total Sales
0.04m
Japan
0.43m
NA
0.09m
Europe
0.05m
Others
0.60m
Total
1 n/a 29,990 n/a 5,292 35,282
2 n/a 14,931 n/a 2,635 17,566
3 n/a 10,720 n/a 1,892 12,612
4 n/a 6,835 n/a 1,206 8,041
5 n/a 5,894 n/a 1,040 6,934
6 n/a 5,419 n/a 956 6,375
7 n/a 3,630 n/a 641 4,271
8 n/a 2,971 n/a 524 3,495
9 n/a 2,418 n/a 427 2,845
10 n/a 2,113 n/a 372 2,485

Opinion (313)

kems posted 01/12/2017, 08:49
I've finished all zelda main games except for BOTW, and I really like japanese stuff... but I think this game is way overrated by it fans. It was my first Wii game and I've tried to finish it a lot of times, but it's so boring that I just can't keep playing it.
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Kynes posted 27/08/2012, 07:02
Great game, it's a pity that it sold much less than it should. The best Zelda-like game I've ever played.
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Matt_182 posted 08/05/2012, 03:09
Okami deserves to have sold much more than what it did. This game is amazing.
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man-bear-pig posted 05/02/2012, 10:37
Who would've thought, eh?
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man-bear-pig posted 05/02/2012, 10:36
So this is where Montana hatchets avi comes from!
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Venox2008 posted 14/01/2012, 11:19
I am little glad glad that at least it outsold PS2 version more than twice, but still it's not enough for such a great and beutiful game like this
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